Easy Rides

​The Coeur d”Alene River Rd ride will take you along and across (several times) the North Fork of the Coeur d'Alene River.  The road is paved for 20 miles.  There is little traffic weekdays.  Summer weekends are very busy. 
Coeur_d_Alene_River_Rd_ride.pdf
click to download
​The East Fork Pine Creek Ride  ride will take you through Pinehurst and then past several abandoned mines.  The East Fork road is rough pavement.  You will pass several old mine sites.
East_Fork_Pine_Creek_ride.pdf
click to download
("easy-road") The Kellogg Silverton Loop is potentially four different road bike loops that begin and end at the Kellogg Trailhead on the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes. If you ride all the way to Silverton, you will have climbed ~400 feet in little over 9 miles. On your return from Silverton, you will pass by a grocery store in Osburn.
  • Elizabeth Park Loop: 3 ¼ miles
  • Big Creek Loop: 7 ¾ miles
  • Gene Day Park Loop: 11 miles
  • Silverton Loop: 18 ½ miles
​map and directions by Ed Renkey
11_SilverValleyRoad_loops.pdf
click to download
​ The Old River Road Ride Trail Head is between the Silver Mt parking lot and the GuestHouse Inn parking lot.  The Old River Road is very scenic.  The pavement is a little rough. It can be quite busy on summer weekends. 
Old_River_Road_ride.pdf
click to download
The Ride to Murray has some elevation gain, but is not difficult. In Murray,ID.  There are numerous old mining buildings The Bedroom Gold Mine and the Spragpole have good food and drink.  The Spragpole Museum is very interesting.   
Ride_to_Murray.pdf
click to download
​("easy-road") The Pine Creek Cataldo Loop is an easy 12.0 mile ride that starts by going west on Silver Valley Road from the Pine Creek Trailhead through Pinehurst and Kingston to Cataldo. Riders return along the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes, perhaps stopping at the Enaville Resort for a satisfying meal in an historic building.
map and directions by Ed Renkey
12_PineCreek2Cataldo.pdf
click to download
("easy-hybrid") The Pine Creek Loops compliment the Kellogg Silverton Loop (# 11) in that all routes begin and end at the Kellogg Trailhead, just off I-90 at Exit 51. In the three loops described here, you begin by riding west on theTrail of the Coeur d'Alenes, rather than east.
  • CIA Loop: 4¾ miles
  • Pine Creek Loop: 10½ miles
  • Pine Creek Loop with a climb (~ 250 feet) to Page: 12½ miles
All three loops contain a 2 mile section between the CIA and I-90 that has some pavement, but is mostly packed gravel. All but the last couple of hundred feet can be ridden with tires as skinny as 700C-32.
map and directions by Ed Renkey
13_PineCreek_loops.pdf
click to download
​("easy-mountain") The 23.6 mile Pearson to Marble Creek is ANOTHER ride for those who have already done the Route of the Hiawatha and are looking for something similar, but FREE. This all-downhill ride starts at the Route of the Hiawatha Pearson Trailhead. The trailhead can be reached via the Moon Pass Road (NFD 456) from either Wallace or Avery. This can also be a continuation of a ride down the Route of the Hiawatha. The ride follows the Old Milwaukee Scenic/Alternate Route 10.8 miles, past a newly renovated campground on the North Fork of the Saint Joe River, to Avery (on ATV-wide trail), and then continues another 12.8 miles along the wide Saint Joe River to the Interpretive Center at Marble Creek.
original map, directions and photos by Ed Renkey
14_Pearson2MarbleCreek.pdf
click to download
 ("easy-mountain") The 33.8 mile route from Marble Creek to Saint Maries completes the 300K Bitterroot Loop mentioned on the main Old Milwaukee Road page. This ride starts at the Marble Creek Historical Site that is 35 miles east of St. Maries on the St. Joe River Road. The Historical Site features accessible display shelters, 8 picnic sites, vault toilets, and potable water. Attractions include displays of early 1900s logging, photos, artifacts, and a replica logging flume. This bicycle route and country road, which follows the Old Milwaukee railroad right-of-way, is not paved. The use of mountain bicycles or hybrids is therfore recommended. At one point, a decision about how to get past a barricaded bridge must be made; two choices are presented. map, directions and photos by Ed Renkey
15_MarbleCreek2SaintMaries.pdf
click to download

Difficult Rides 

("difficult-hybrid") ​The expert 15.8 mile Dudley Saddle Loop is for the mountain bike rider who loves to climb. Most of the ride is on dirt or gravel roads. The first five miles consists of a 1450-foot climb. Of course, the next five miles are all down hill to the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes. The last five miles are on the Trail between Dudley and the Black Rock Trailhead. The only restroom is at the Bull Run Trailhead.
map and directions by Larry and Echo Halley
03_DudleySaddle_loop.pdf
click to download
​("difficult-road") The expert 52.6 mile Dobson Pass Loop is for the experienced paved road bike rider who loves to climb. The ride starts and ends on the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes. It leaves the Trail at the Wallace Trailhead and continues on two-lane paved roads over Dobson Pass (elevation 4090 feet) and then returns to the Trail at the Enaville Trailhead. The first 6 miles out of Wallace is a steep climb to the pass. Of course, the next 29 miles are all down hill until you reach the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes again.
map and directions by Ed Renkey
04_DobsonPass_loop.pdf
click to download

Other Trails in the Silver Valley Area:

Silver Mountain Bike Park offers a wide variety of trails for everyone. With North America's longest gondola we have quick and easy access to North Idaho's best lift served bike trails. 30 single track trails, 28 of which are gravity oriented ensure that you will find one to fit your riding style. We have a new fleet of downhill and trail bikes along with all the helmets and armor you need to push your skills with confidence.
​It was called one of the most scenic stretches of railroad in the country. When the Milwaukee Railroad was operating, the trains traversed through 11 tunnels and over 9 high trestles, covering a 46 mile route that crossed the rugged Bitterroot Mountains between Idaho and Montana. The "Route of the Hiawatha" is most famous for the long St. Paul Pass, or Taft Tunnel which burrows for 8771 ft. (1.66 miles) under the Bitterroot Mountains at the state line.
The Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes bike path follows the Union Pacific Railroad right-of-way from Mullan, a mountain mining town near the Montana border, to Plummer, a town on the prairie near the Washington border. More than 71 miles of paved path takes you from high mountain splendor, through the historic Silver Valley, into the chain lakes region, along the shore of Lake Coeur d'Alene, over the Chatcolet Bridge to Heyburn State Park, and finally climbs to the Palouse prairie: an adventure for the entire family!

Moderate Rides 

​These beautiful loop trips involve Anderson and Thompson Lakes near Harrison. The mileage in the directions is based on riding around both lakes, a total of 16.2 miles. Each lake could also be circumnavigated as a separate ride. The directions describe how to ride for each option. A bicycle with wide tires is recommended since the roads around both lakes are packed gravel.
map and directions by Ed Renkey and Larry Halley
01_AndersonThompsonLakes.pdf
click to download
​The historically interesting Tamerack Ridge Route begins near the oldest building in Idaho, the Cataldo Mission. Canyon Road, Tamarack Ridge Road, and River Road have more hills and less shade than you will encounter along the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes. If you are starting from Cataldo late in the day, you might want to ride in the opposite direction so that you are on the trail when it is hotter, and on the roads when it is cooler. The 18.7 mile loop could also begin at the Bull Run Trailhead.
map and directions by Ed Renkey
02_TamarackRidge_loop.pdf
click to download
​The 16.2 mile East Portal to Saltese Loop is for those who have already done the Route of the Hiawatha and are looking for something similar, but FREE. This ride starts at the East Portal of the Taft Tunnel and goes in the other direction! You follow the Milwaukee Road railbed east to the town of Saltese, 9 miles away and 700 feet lower in elevation. The return ride is uphill along the Northern Pacific railbed, adjacent to I-90. If you continue west on the Northern Pacific Railroad trail, rather than returning to the East Portal at Taft, you will arrive at Lookout Pass, where you have the choice of two routes down to Mullan and the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes.
map and directions by Ed Renkey and Larry Halley
06_EastPortal2Saltese_loop.pdf
click to download
​The 21.5 mile Pearson Avery Figure Eight is ANOTHER ride for those who have already done the Route of the Hiawatha and are looking for something similar, but FREE. This ride starts at the Route of the Hiawatha Pearson Trailhead. The trailhead can be reached via the Moon Pass Road (NFD 456) from either Wallace or Avery. This can also be a continuation of a ride on the Route of the Hiawatha. The ride follows the Old Milwaukee Scenic/Alternate Route to Avery, and returns to the Pearson Trailhead on the Moon Pass Road. The Moon Pass Road from the Pearson Trailhead to Avery is the abandoned railroad right-of-way of the Chicago, Milwaukee and Puget Sound Railway (Note the initials on the tunnel portals). Riders will lose and gain back about 700 feet of elevation as they travel the packed dirt roads.
map, directions and photos by Ed Renkey and Larry Halley
07_Pearson-AveryFigure8.pdf
click to download
("moderate-mountain") The CCC Road - Wall Road Loop is a 13.4 mile mixture of flat and steep terrain that each year, on the Summer Equinox, becomes the venue of a bicycle event that combines the ride with a benefit and BBQ.More information is shown below.
map and directions by Ed Renkey
08_CCC_WallRoad_loop.pdf
click to download
​("moderate-mountain") Enhancement and promotion of the NorPac Trail that joins the end of the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes to the beginning of the Route of the Hiawatha, 22.4 miles away, has been a goal of this organization since its beginning. In 2004, Friends of the Trails was awarded a $21K grant to provide a vault toilet, picnic tables and interpretive signs along this multi-use Northern Pacific railbed. Although the trail follows a paved country road for the first four miles, a mountain bike or other bike with at least 700C-32 tires is needed for the rest of the ride. map, directions and photos by Ed Renkey
09_NorPac_Trail.pdf
click to download
​The Sunshine Mine Ride will begin on the Trail of the Coeur d’Alenes then continue on Big Creek Road to the Sunshine Mine.  Big Creek Road has some rough spots. 
Sunshine_Mine_ride.pdf
click to download
​("moderate-road")  The 7.0 mile route from Wallace to Burke takes the rider back in time along a paved country road. This ride will take you through several deserted mining towns on the way to the largest one at Burke. At one time, 5000 people lived in seven mining towns along this narrow canyon. The road is fairly smooth with long sweeping curves and lightly traveled. There is a 1000 ft elevation gain in this 7 mile ride. The climb is steady, but not difficult. At one time the Union Pacific and Northern Pacific ran standard gauge rails up this canyon beside a narrow gauge railroad. The boom town of Burke had these rail lines running down main street.
map, directions and photos by Ed Renkey
16_Wallace2Burke.pdf
click to download

Expert Rides 

The Coeur d’Alene River Loop Ride will take several days. Check with the trail manager (208)682-3814 before you park overnight at the trailhead.
Coeur_d'Alene_River_Loop_Rev_1.pdf;
click to download
​Here is another way to enjoy the NorPac Trail that involves a bit more adventure... and exercise. This Wallace to Lookout Pass and Back trip starts across from the Wallace Visitor's Center, just off I-90 at Exit 61. You will climb AND descend 2495 feet on this 36.0 mile ride. The first and last 10 miles on the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes and a country road is easy, and the NorPac Trail up to Lookout Pass is a multi-use dirt road, so the adventure part begins at the Pass when you get on single track trail that descends 4 miles through a cedar and pine forest. The single track is very steep in places.
10_WallaceLookout_loop.pdf
click to download
("difficult-mountain")​ The Beefcamp Jewel Loop is a rigorous mountain bike adventure through dense forests. It begins just off the Trail in Osburn, and climbs 2240 feet in 10.5 miles, following Beefcamp Trail #102 up to a crows foot junction with Jewel Trail #103, which drops rapidly back to town.
map and directions by Ed Renkey and Larry Halley
05_BeefcampJewel_loop.pdf
click to download

North Idaho Centennial Trail - just west of the Silver Valley